Postbureaucrat

Personal blogging by Steph Gray, founder of Helpful Digital and erstwhile bureaucrat

26 comments on “How to work with online communities

  1. lesteph says:

    Blog post: How to work with online communities http://via.leste.ph/a16tTV

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  2. lesteph says:

    Run an online community, or want to find out how to work with one? Come to Meet The Communities: http://via.leste.ph/ccAn8T

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  3. How to work with online communities:

    Of all the projects I worked on at DIUS/BIS, the one I am still most… http://bit.ly/bAHmiu

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  4. Alistair says:

    Great post Steph, as always. Working with communities, and doing it well is going to be really exciting – and necessary – as long as govt can provide something of worth in return, as you’ve outlined. Would love to be at the event.

    As for the bit about Facebook, and students not being able to use it to collaborate because they don’t want to share certain things with certain people – this guide on how to set up Facebook lists and put specific privacy settings on them, should get round that:

    http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/13/how-to-effectively-manage-your-facebook-privacy-settings-with-l/

    So, no need for TSR after all (just kidding.)

  5. Insight_TSR says:

    Steph Gray interviews me (Jamie from TSR) & describes the benefits of working closely with large web communities: http://bit.ly/duGJJo

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  6. Insight_TSR says:

    Steph Gray interviews Jamie from The Student Room & describes benefits of working closely with large web communities: http://bit.ly/duGJJo

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  7. Steve Dale says:

    Steph – always interested in anything to do with collaboration and communities (and particularly CoPs given my involvement with http://www.communities.idea.go.uk). Happy to help at at the September event, or just be part of the buzz.

  8. Dave Briggs says:

    Great post, great idea. Let me know if I can help, and if Learning Pool can support you in some way.

    This is kinda getting into the territory of an idea I had for the Building Democracy competition, craply called ‘Communicosm‘.

  9. […] How to work with online communities at Helpful Technology – "But there are many other ways to build relationships, and lots more experience to share. To help explore this further, I’m helping to convene Meet The Communities, a free, one-off event probably in Central London during September, bringing together some of the leading online communities with the government clients, PR & digital agencies for an afternoon of storytelling and speednetworking." […]

  10. NLoverheid20 says:

    How to work with online communities at Helpful Technology: http://bit.ly/bAHmiu

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  11. zazo says:

    How to work with online communities http://bit.ly/duGJJo

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  12. noelito says:

    if you want to know how to engage with online communities, you could do worse than check http://bit.ly/ajTxkU @lesteph #fb

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  13. James Munro says:

    Hi Steph – thanks for this interesting post. At Patient Opinion we definitely feel there is plenty of scope for sharing across the govt-civil society boundary in all kinds of ways.
    For example, we make sure all our public data can be accessed via an API for reuse (as NHS Choices is doing), and we’ve recently launched a free email alerting service for MPs.
    But the relationship between online communities and govt can’t ever be a simple and straightforward one since, after all, the value of such communities to their members may be precisely that they are nothing to do with formal authority.
    If a member of govt “dropped in” in person to a local mums meeting, I suspect the topic of conversation might alter somewhat. Might the same be true of online communities if they felt govt was listening in? Who knows?
    But this is clearly an emerging area that needs discussion and debate, and we’d love to be part of your Sept event if we can be.

  14. Interesting blog post from @lesteph on govt and online communities: http://bit.ly/duGJJo

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  15. Hey Steph

    Simon and I would love to attend – looking forward to it

  16. carlhaggerty says:

    How to work with online communities http://j.mp/c7cgbZ < superb stuff #yam

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  17. BredaDoherty says:

    How to work with online communities-@davebriggs gets a mention-http://bit.ly/duGJJo

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  18. cosmickated says:

    How to work with online communities http://bit.ly/dk99SP

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  19. […] over on Helpful Technology writes about the Mature Students partnership between Directgov and The Student Room which is extremely […]

  20. lesteph says:

    Quick pimp: tell me if you’re interested in meeting online community leaders at an event in September: http://bit.ly/d8Zdl0

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  21. adiwick says:

    @lesteph I’d imagine that @timolloyd would be interested. Tim: http://bit.ly/d8Zdl0

    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  22. […] How to work with online communities at Helpful Technology There are as many ways to tap into and use these incredibly precious resources as there are facets to human nature. And it’s because of this humanity – and hopefully goes without saying – that communities need to be treated with respect. On the one hand, there is a strong current of volunteering and willingness to help good causes. On the other, there’s the need to eat. Sure, Government is strapped for cash, but there are lots of ways Government can help without spending much money Comment (RSS)  |  Trackback […]

  23. […] Meet The Communities: a networking event for leaders of online communities, government clients and the agencies who work for them to explore how sustained, two-way partnerships with online communities can help government and citizens communicate better, more openly, and more cheaply (just finalising the venue) […]